The Sun & Her Flowers by Rupi Kaur

I’m sure you’ve seen some of Rupi Kaur’s poetry all over your social media and it’s probably made you cry. Or at the very least, pulled at your heart strings just a little bit. Unless you’re the Grinch or that guy who says ‘Bah Humbug’ during the holiday season every year.

Rupi Kaur writes poems on everything from being an immigrant to falling in love to being victim to sexual violence & incest. Her stuff is powerful, poignant, and gut wrenching at the same time. I read her first book, Milk and Honey, earlier this year and thought this second novel of hers would be a similar gut punch. While it was, I wasn’t expecting to have nightmares, flashbacks, and an unexpected catharsis at the end of it.

She’s blunt in her diagnosis of being a child of immigrants and how strenuous it was on her parents to come somewhere new and with a significant language barrier. Her work is novel in its simplicity and it’s no shocking development that The Sun & Her Flowers is yet again a bestseller for Kaur. Her pieces are short, sweet, and to the point. They pack a punch harder than Tyson and Mayweather combined but with the virality of something you can’t stop thinking about it, even when you don’t want to.

Kaur is brilliant. Her work came to success thru social media and the day & age where we passionately look for something to cling to when we’re so unsure mentally and politically. For me at least, Kaur put my own pain and triumph into words. She made things in my past come to light and made me face them head on not because I was afraid but because I was ready to tackle them. I wasn’t alone after reading her work and I’m beyond thankful for that.

Whenever somebody can take trauma into words that are poignant and not condescending, I’m in awe. And i’m thankful for the addition to the ever changing conversation. With the ever growing need for the arts, especially poetry, we need authors and poets like Rupi Kaur to be unashamed in their past and vigilante in their futures.

Be warned, this book is frank in its discussion of sexual violence, abuse, and immigration. If you’re in a spot where you can read about this subject matter, please do. It will take your breath away but it will bring you back to center all in the same cover to cover.

Favourite poem: I woke up thinking the work was done/I would not have to practice today/how naive to think healing was that easy/when there is no end point/no finish line to cross/healing is everyday work 

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The Princess Saves Herself in This One by Amanda Lovelace

It always seems like after i read an intense book, the next book I almost always read is one of poetry. Maybe because it was my first love or maybe its because it soothes my soul. Or both. Probably both. Anyway, on to this.

The Princess Saves Herself in This One is beautifully written. You’ve probably seen some of Amanda Lovelace’s work on either TUmblr, Youtube, or a variety of social media. It’s short, sweet, and makes you think. It’s gut wrenching at times and exhilaratingly inspiring in others. I finished it in maybe 3 hours, if that, and I have absolutely zero regrets about it.

If you want a good Sunday afternoon read that will tear on your heart strings, comes with a trigger warning, and will leave you feeling strong & beautiful, then this book is for you. It dives deep and swims wide, so fair warning. But you will not be able to put it down. So you can’t say I didn’t warn you.

5/5 

Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur

If you’re on Instagram, or any form of social media for that matter, I’m beyond positive you’ve seen Rupi Kaur’s poetry shared at least once. Her work is brilliant, thought provoking, and heart wrenching. It will be a sucker punch to the gut you’ll regrettably enjoy. And you’ll hand  your heart over to her articulate words to be gutted, to be reborn again.

Her first book of poetry, Milk and Honey, is separated into 4 sections. The sections are about breaking, healing, loving, and hurting. I read this in the day and am fully planning on reading again when I’m hurting, when I’m healing, and when I’m loving. And full disclosure, I’ve had a rough past couple days so I turned to her words to bring me back to the light. 

Kaur’s words are brilliant. Read this in the best days of your life and in the worst. She’ll remind you that you’re worth it all the same. Poetry can and will save lives. Poetry reminds us that we’re worth it, that there’s beauty in every crevice — no matter how dark it is before you get out.

Favourite line: you must enter a relationship/with yourself/before anyone else